UKSF? In Liverpool terrorist raids

Found a couple of pictures (unsubstantiated, of course) of what I suspect are SAS or SBS troopers involved in yesterday’s house raids in Liverpool.

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What’s that on his back? Shotgun? Breaching tool? Slap charge?

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Pretty sure its a shotgun, there was originally a short video on ITV News which has now mysteriously disappeared.

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Must be UKSF, British cops seem to be pretty big on the MAS/whatever Grey colour scheme these days.

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I don’t think cops run suppressors either, definitely Armed Forces. Surprised no sign of MCX / LVAW for an operation like that. Maybe they aren’t running them after all.

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My reasoning exactly , guys.
To my knowledge UK police have never used camouflage kit , suppressors ( for obvious reasons) and additionally they are usually plastered in highly visible “Police” patches.
Unfortunately due to the MODs policy of never commenting on SF ops it can’t be verified.
Quite interesting was also the fact that most of the police pictured were armed with G36 , which could be down to the fact it was not the Met counter terrorist officers with their sigs but Merseyside police armed officers?

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Whatever is on the one guy’s back is hard to tell, given the lack of image sharpness. Stare at it hard enough, and it could be a short breaching shotgun doing its best “nothing going on here” impression.

I saw this image of a LEO responder at the bombing site, earlier this week.

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Managed to find a few more images , one, clearly showing one of the other guys with a shotgun clearly visible as well as a cop carrying one.


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Has the SAS ever been caught on camera / video after the embassy raid? I’m pretty sure they are the most low-key SF out there

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The UK ministry of defence will almost never comment on Special Forces deployments, so it’s near impossible to verify if they are SAS or any other SF , but you can usually tell by the equipment they are using that they aren’t police or regular army.

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Does the MOD have a domestic law enforcement mandate? I’ve seen what are clearly SAS/SBSguys in a few high profile raids over the past few years, and am always confused, as US SF operators almost never take part in armed actions in-country.

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I am no expert but I believe the MOD has a mandate to assist law enforcement domestically and it is now noticeable that in raids involving suspected terrorism there is a noticeable military element.
I also found this in an article:

Following the deadly 2015 Paris attacks, the British government formed an unofficial, secretive 70-man counterterrorism unit. Comprised of SAS and SBS operators, alongside support personnel, the unit is tasked with constant, no-notice counterterrorism duties. They are supported by the UK Army [Air Corps’ (AAC) 658 Squadron]

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Training and support missions in CONUS have been allowed for military personnel. A friend operated as Engineer support along part of the US-Mexico border, years ago (pre-fence era). The issue of being armed was a factor for them.

The double-edged situation of Regular/SOF activities in CONUS can have a range of complexities.

IIRC back in the 1980s, the SAS CRW (Counter Revolutionary Warfare?) unit regularly trained for domestic crises by hopping in their vehicles and blasting along the highway shoulders from Hereford to London.

I think to remember from a book either by Pete Winner or Andy Mc Nab that the SAS can be called in in case of terrorism where police forces alone are not sufficiently trained or equipped to counter the threat, as seen e.g. during the Iranian Embassy siege and raid.
Don’t nail me down on that one, though, I’d have to research it.

EDIT:
I’ve done some quick reading. In contrast to the US, British law has no equivalent to the Posse Commitatus Act. Thus, domestic use of the military is not per se banned.
By legal agreement, the military has to be called upon by civilian/police authorities for aid before it is deployed.
At the request of (usually) the responsible police chief - through Home Office and in agreement with the MoD - the military can provide “specialised military assistance to the civil power” (MACP), for instance in a terrorist attack.

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Clean House in real life?

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